Latest Stories

Stranded young vulture rescued at Episkopi Bay
New solar-thermal park in Alassa puts Cyprus vultures at risk
Will our vultures be breeding this year? News from our latest vulture count

All Stories

12 September 2019
An unlucky young Griffon Vulture stranded on a rocky beach at Episkopi Bay saw its luck turn around thanks to a BirdLife Cyprus volunteer that happened to be in the area. The bird was found wet, in distress and unable to fly.
30 August 2019
News of the Ministerial Council approving a framework for financial support of a solar-thermal park in Alassa from the State should have been welcoming. Especially because climate change is one of the most significant threats facing our planet today and renewable energy is part of the answer to this problem.
09 February 2018
Ever since the GYPAS project began in 2011, counts of the Cyprus Griffon Vultures have been taking place twice a year, in winter and in spring. 
02 November 2017
The positive news we had last spring on the record of new Griffon Vulture nests unfortunately did not last. On 21 October a young Griffon Vulture was found dead at Ai Yiannis area at Vretsia. This vulture was probably the one that was recorded as a nestling on the cliffs of the area during the usual island-wide vulture census last May.
31 August 2017
Vultures are magnificent creatures but too often misunderstood. Their carrion diet is most likely the culprit. Interestingly, their diet is also what makes them an integral part of ecosystems. How? By keeping the system disease-free. 
01 August 2017
Vultures are important. By being nature’s clean-up crew they are an integral part of nature. Thanks to their carrion diet, they prevent the spread of diseases produced by decaying carcasses. Vultures also help cattle ranchers, not only because they clean up the fields, but also because they eliminate the need for the treatment and incineration of thousands of tons of animal remains every year.
22 June 2017
The Griffon Vulture is the largest bird of prey in Cyprus and also the most threatened. The population is at a worryingly low level and breeding pairs scarce. In early June, three active vulture nests were found, one in Pafos district in an area where a significant colony of the species used to exist in the past. The nest belongs to birds which were brought from Crete through the GYPAS project. The other two nests were located at Episkopi Cliffs, which is where the largest colony of the species is found in what is the most stable breeding site of the species in recent years.
30 May 2017
On Friday 12 May 2017, BirdLife Cyprus volunteers and staff, together with the Game and Fauna Service, carried out the annual spring census of the Griffon Vulture. The team of 20 observers covered eight look-out points spread across the vulture feeding range and known breeding and roosting cliffs, while the Game and Fauna Service set up cameras at the vulture feeding stations.
31 December 2016
On Friday 9 December 2016, BirdLife Cyprus volunteers and staff, together with the Game and Fauna Service and the SBA Environmental Department, carried out the annual winter census of the Griffon Vulture for 2016/17. The team of observers covered seven look-out points spread across the vulture feeding range and known breeding and roosting cliffs, while the Game and Fauna Service set up cameras at the vulture feeding stations.
29 February 2016
Seven Griffon Vultures Gyps fulvus met a tragic end, three of which were birds that were released in Cyprus in the framework of the successful GYPAS project which was carried out under the ‘Cross Border Cooperation Programme Greece-Cyprus 2007-2013’, while the remaining three were birds from the extremely small Cyprus population and one that was born at the Limassol Zoo and released. The birds were found dead in Paramali/Sterakovou area in the Limassol region in the last few weeks and were collected by the Game and Fauna Service and were sent for post-mortem examinations by the Veterinary Services. 

Get our news by email
Subscribe to our newsletter


P.O. Box 12026
2340, Nicosia Cyprus
(+357) 22 455 072

 
Follow us: